Applying to teach in Spain – which school should you choose

It’s the time of year when International schools begin their advertising for positions starting in September. But, if you are considering a move to teaching in Spain how do you know which school to choose?

Teaching in Spain offers three options. The first option and the one I will focus on in this article is teaching in a British school in Spain. British schools will teach the British National Curriculum. The other two options are to work as an English teacher in a Spanish school or to teach in an academy. The Spanish education system is quite protective of Spanish teachers and entering a Spanish state school would require a high level language exam in Spanish and then the Spanish exam of teacher knowledge. (Convalidating English teaching degrees in order that they can be recognised by a Spanish state school is notoriously challenging and expensive.)  An academy in Spain is not the same as in England. “Academy” refers to language schools. Often these will operate outside of the normal school day and will offer language lessons in a TEfL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) style approach. Although a living can be made from an academy a regular monthly income can often not be guaranteed. Hours will be as customer demands and there is likely to be significant fluctuation in monthly take home pay.

So, what about teaching in a British School in Spain? The first requirement of any reputable British School will be that candidates for teaching positions are qualified teachers. Most will also ask that the qualification is from the United Kingdom or recognised in the United Kingdom. Applicants from outside of the European Union are often welcomed but obtaining the necessary work permits can take longer.

Within Spain the private school industry is relatively unregulated compared to the United Kingdom. Consequently there are ‘good’ and ‘bad’ employers to be found. Most UK teachers with experience of working overseas will tell you that accreditation from the British Council is the most important recognition. In Spain there are only a very few schools directly licensed by the British Council. However, there is an established network within Spain that provides a considerable benefit to UK teachers looking to work in a British School. The organisation ‘National Association of British Schools in Spain’ (NABBS) has a recognition within the UK and provides a set of standards and employee rights that gives a level of protection and ensures that the school is of an appropriate standard. These schools also undergo an inspection that is approved by the British Council and responsable for ensuring a high quality of British education.

You can cross-reference advertisements on TES Online with the NABBS website. Once you have confirmed that the school has British Council or NABBS membership you can be reasonably assured that you have identified an appropriate potential employer.

Most Spanish independent schools are privately owned and most of those are privately owned by a Spanish family or a Spanish company. In essence, like many UK private schools, they are businesses. The most significant difference for many teachers moving to teach in Spain is not actually the change of country but the change from being in state education to being in private education. I would advise that happier adaptations to this change are found if the school itself has a duty of care for the education provided. This can be found out in a number of ways. Firstly, looking at the advertisement that the school has placed. I would be wary of any school not taking advantage of a profesional advertisement on TES Online. Failing to provide a school insignia, photographs or a link to the school website all indicate a business keen to save every possible penny. If the webite is available take a look. Does it appear to be just a shop window, an online advert, or does it reflect the values and mission statement of the school? Does the school provide a welcome pack as a part of their advertisement? Does the welcome pack include information about support given to employees?

Having applied to the school, reputable schools will consider an interview a two way process and will welcome your questions. If the advertisement is for a short notice position then a Skype or telephone interview may be offered. However, if the position has been advertised with sufficient time then a face to face interview is a more profesional approach. A school advertising a September post in March or April that is unwilling to finance a face to face interview in the UK I would suggest is sending out a negative message about the value they place on their teaching staff.

As a final thought, what should you expecct from an interview? British schools in Spain, especially if they have visited London or another UK city to offer face to face interview, have made a substantial financial commitment to obtaining their teaching staff. They will be interested not only in your profesional role as a teacher but also in your personal profile as somebody preparing to make an international move. Anything you can do to indicate preparation for your move will strengthen your interview. Have you begun to learn the language? Have you considered aspects of adaptation to living away from family and friends? The interview is also a two way process. There should be a chance for you to ask what support the school offers new teachers. Relocation packages in terms of direct financial gifts are not common for Spain but support in terms of finding accomodation and arranging necessary paperwork including becoming a part of the Spanish health system should be provided.

If you approach a move carefully and consider the school and the support offered then living and teaching in Spain can be a wonderful move. With sunshine, almost universally supportive parents andvery few behaviour problems it is easier to focus on the teaching and remember why you chose this profession.

If you want further information please do post questions in the comments section below and I will reply.

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  1. Pingback: Teaching posts and all the info. you need about teaching abroad | Living and teaching in Spain

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