Category Archives: Teaching in Spain

Foundation, KS1 and KS2 teaching posts for September 2015

New teaching posts available in Spain for September 2015.
Teach in Spain – visit the links to the TES Online advertisement below and apply for your September 2015 teaching position.
If you have any other questions about living or teaching in Spain then please do post them in the comments box and I will reply.

All teachers are offered a full time, permanent contract from the first day of their employment. Annual salary is made in 12 monthly payments and tax is payable at the local rate. The school is able to offer some flexibility in year group and accepts applications from teachers in foundation, Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2. Newly Qualified Teachers are welcome to apply.
The final date for applications is Friday 8th May 2015 with interviews held in London during the week beginning Monday 11th May 2015.

Foundation/KS1/KS2 teaching post

Below are links to a variety of pages providing information about living and teaching in Spain. If you need more information about teaching in Spain please do contact us.

5 things NQTs should know about working abroad

5 things to know about renting in Spain

5 tips for your interview with an international school

Relocating to Spain with a family – a guide

Teaching in a British School in Spain – a FAQ

A comparison between teaching in Spain and teaching in the UK

Applying to teach in Spain – which school should you choose?

 

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Foundation and Key Stage 1 teaching posts for September 2015

Posts available in British schools in Madrid and Andalucia.

Teaching positions are currently being recruited for a September 2015 start. There are positions available for Foundation Stage teachers, Key Stage 1 teachers and also for assistants. The basic salary offered is 22,500€ with increments available for teachers with the experience to take on a coordinator role.

Teach in Spain. British schools in Spain provide the opportunity to teach the British curriculum in a stunning setting.

Teach in Andalucia in the south of Spain or if you prefer the city life, teach in Madrid.

To apply please send you CV and a covering letter to:
recruitment@ukteacherinspain.com

Interviews will be via Skype.

To read more information about teaching in Spain check the articles below.

5 things NQTs should know about working abroad

5 things to know about renting in Spain

5 tips for your interview with an international school

Relocating to Spain with a family – a guide

Teaching in a British school in Spain – a FAQ

A comparison between teaching in Spain and teaching in the UK

Applying to teach in Spain – which school should you choose?

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Teaching posts and all the info. you need about teaching abroad

Teaching posts in Spain and the links that give you the information you need, all in one place.
If you have any other questions about living or teaching in Spain then please do post them in the comments box and I will reply.

Primary teaching post
Secondary English (plus humanities) post
Secondary Maths (plus science) post

As of 10th March 2015 the teaching posts above are now filled. If you are interested in applying for a teaching position in Spain please send your Curriculum Vitae together with a covering letter to: recruitment@ukteacherinspain.com

5 things NQTs should know about working abroad

5 things to know about renting in Spain

5 tips for your interview with an international school

Relocating to Spain with a family – a guide

Teaching in a British School in Spain – a FAQ

A comparison between teaching in Spain and teaching in the UK

Applying to teach in Spain – which school should you choose?

5 things I never worried about when I taught in England

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5 things I never worried about when I taught in England

1: Wildlife
This winter we are told has been a perfect breeding ground for the processional caterpillar. With toxic hairs that easily take to the wind it is one of the most poisonous creatures locally. We go from caterpillar season into the summer when funnel web spiders and a variety of non-lethal but evil looking scorpions provide a playground distraction to any child armed with a stick.

Caterpillars

Processional caterpillars

2: What’s for lunch?
Food is such an important part of Spanish culture and parents expect their children to eat all of their lunch. Lentils as a starter and fish as a main course provides a midday motivational challenge for any duty teacher. School dinners in the UK always felt like something functional, a midday fuel up to carry us through the afternoon. I’d be misleading if I suggested every day was equal. However, a day that starts with a chicken caesar salad, has a traditional Spanish rice dish such as “arroz al horno” for a main course and finishes with fresh oranges makes school dinner feel less like fuel and more like a dining experience.

Traditional Spanish rice dish

Arroz al horno – a rice dish made with pork ribs and blood sausage

3: Wind
A windy day in England meant that the children were a little more bubbly than usual. Teachers walked around with long faces muttering glib asides about animals and children “having the wind up them”.
The tiniest bit of wind in Spain puts us on tree watch. Mediterranean pines are notoriously fragile. Dry and top heavy, the slightest breeze can cause weighty branches to topple. In fact, there is a general preoccupation with weather. Rain, wind, cold and sun all bring their own concerns.

4: Food consumption
Spanish culture provides for five meals each day. A light breakfast in the morning, a mid-morning snack, lunch, an afternoon snack and a dinner are considered essential pit stops in the working day. Ensuring all the children have been provided in the main meal of the day but also in the two snacks that take place in the school day is one of the most important responsibilities of the day.

5: Buses!
Each morning 15 coaches arrive at school. Each carries up to 58 children, many of whom will be clutching notes instructing which bus route they will be taking home. Maybe they are going to a grandparents house after school, or a family house in the mountains or by the beach. Other bus changes will be telephoned in to school during the day. The task of getting over 800 children on to the right transport is a complex nightmare that somehow seems to pull perfectly together in the last few minutes of every day.

And aside from all of the above we still manage to spend focusing on teaching and learning and making sure that each of the children gets a great deal from attending our school.

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NQTs abroad – 5 things all NQTs should know

With grateful thanks to @MissNQT for prompting this article. Here are 5 things NQTs should know if they are going to spend their first year teaching abroad. (All based on my own experience of working in an international school in Spain.)

Hello my name is the NQT

1: How long do I have to complete my induction year?
After completing the teaching course and gaining Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) you have to complete an induction year. Currently there is no time limit on when this has to be completed. If you are not in a permanent post though you can only do short term supply (posts of less than one term) for up to five years.
Point 1: Your induction year is completely without time limit. No matter how long you spend teaching abroad you can complete your induction year when/if you return to the UK.

2: Can I complete my induction year in an international school?
Technically “yes” due to a change that came in during 2014. If the school you work in has had a British Schools Overseas (BSO) inspection then they can choose to offer NQT induction. Because this is managed by a teaching school in the UK the cost to the international school is quite significant and therefore even schools that have opted for a BSO inspection may choose not to oversee your induction year. The BSO inspection only came in recently though and therefore most overseas school are not BSO inspected.
Point 2: Technically you can complete your induction year in a small but growing number of international schools. However, this option is unlikely to be available to you.

Get Ready to Teach: A Guide for the Newly Qualified Teacher (NQT)

3: So, what happens if I haven’t done my induction year but have spent some time abroad?
Teaching at an independent school can’t count as an induction year but local authorities can reduce your induction time to as little as one term if they recognise the experience you have gained in an independent school. It is possible that they may apply this to your time spent teaching abroad. If not, returning to the UK would mean beginning you induction year.
Point 3: When you return to the UK you may be asked to do your induction year but you may also be able to negotiate it to as little as one term.

Not Quite a Teacher: Target Practice for Beginning Teachers

4: What about my pay and conditions?
Pay in Spain does not follow the teacher pay spine as used in the UK. All teachers start on the same salary of 22,500€ per year. This makes the salary in Spain, even with current exchange rates, quite comparable to that paid to NQTs in the UK. Planning and preparation time will often be far in excess of that given in the UK. We don’t give our NQTs more time than other teachers but all teaching staff in our primary department have five hours of preparation time per week. In addition there is a full hour for lunch and an additional fifty minutes of break time each day. With less workload caused by unnecessary paperwork NQTS working in our schools are better off in terms of planning and preparation time than they would be in the UK.
Point 4: Pay in Spain for an NQT is 22,500€ per year. Factor in the lower cost of living and lower taxes and as an NQT you are financially better off in Spain. Planning and preparation time is generous and in excess of that given to you in the UK.

How to survive your first year in teaching
by Sue Cowley

5: Be the best you can be.
It sounds like basic advice but make sure that these first years of teaching are the springboard to a long and happy career. Don’t treat your time abroad as downtime before returning to work in the UK. Apply yourself to the job and seek advice when needed. Be the best you can be. By acting professionally you are developing your skill and writing a reference that makes you far more attractive to UK schools. Your time spent teaching the British curriculum abroad will make your applications stand out. New skills such as working with a high proportion of EAL pupils or even learning a foreign language yourself will all help to make you an interesting candidate for a future career move, whether that be to the UK or anywhere else in the world.
Point 5: Be the best you can be.

Teacher Tote Bag by CafePress

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Dear teacher…

Today sees the publication of our adverts for positions at British School Alzira/Xativa.

Primary school post: Foundation – Key Stage 2

Secondary post: English (with secondary subject humanities)

Secondary post: Maths (with secondary subject science)

I came here seven years ago with the intention of enjoying the experience for a couple of years.

The truth is that the children are engaging and positive about their learning. The school achieves excellent standards and teachers enjoy being a part of that team. I have written a number of blog posts to help people considering a move to Spain and I am reposting them here so that potential candidates have access to a wealth of information.

If you still have questions about our schools or just general questions about relocating to Spain then please do post them in the comments section.

5 things to know about renting in Spain

Your interview with an international school

Relocating to Spain with family

Teaching in a British School in Spain – FAQ

A comparison between teaching in Spain and teaching in the United Kingdom

Applying to teach in Spain – which school should you choose?

 

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Your interview with an International school

After seven years of recruiting for British schools in Spain I have put together 5 tips for teachers approaching an interview with an international school.

1: Maintain the focus on education
It is easy to get drawn into generalisations about your future host country. Try to avoid these as they hide you as a teacher. When asked why you want to go to a specific country a glib “love the food and love the culture” doesn’t separate you from the crowd. Try to prepare answers that show you are thinking about developing yourself professionally or personally. Use the questions that are asked as vehicles to communicate your teaching philosophy and wherever possible put in relevant examples of your work. A portfolio that provides examples of your planning, professional development and classroom practice can be a useful tool to refer to when answering questions and can help to keep your responses tightly focused on education.

2: Provide positive reasons for your relocation
Many people looking to work in an international school may well do so because they are feeling disenchanted with some aspects of state education in the UK. During your interview focus on the reasons you are attracted to the school or country you are considering to make your new home. If you overly focus on aspects of the education system that you dislike you risk sounding like a ‘moaner’. Nobody wants negativity in the staff room so whilst sharing some opinions helps to present you in an open way, stay positive.

3: Research
Find out what you can about the school and the area. If you have been sent a welcome pack then do read it and don’t waste interview time asking questions that have already been covered. Check out the school website. Come to the interview ready to show you have done this homework. It creates a great impression if you can respond positively to an event already covered on the school website. (“It looks as though everybody in the school had a great time when they celebrated …”)
It helps to know a little about the area too. Have a look on Google maps. Start thinking about where teachers may live and be asking questions about the area from the standpoint of having already done a little homework.
You may find in moving to an International school that you are moving into a curriculum that is unfamiliar to you. Again, whilst it shows a professional attitude to ask what support may be on offer to help you adapt to the curriculum, it is important to have done your research so you are able to answer curriculum questions on interview.

4: Be open and be interesting
Most international schools, especially if this is your first relocation or your first time in the host country, will be looking at you personally and considering whether you have the character needed to be happy and to make your move successful. Be prepared to discuss your hobbies and even to have some idea of how you may be able to continue those hobbies when you move. It may feel at times as though the interview is prying slightly more into your personal life than if you were interviewing for a school in your home country.

5: Approach the interview as a two way process
Most international schools will send out a detailed welcome pack in advance of the interview. Many will also give a presentation about their school and the area in which they work as a part of the interview. The interview is a two way process and you should approach the interview with a confidence and determination to get straight answers to any of your own questions. This may be the only time you have before relocating to find out what the school offers. Be clear with your questions and make sure that all details about your contract and the support offered by the school are clear before you leave the interview.
It is a two way process and you are picking the school and team of people that you would like to work with as much as them choosing you. Remember, wherever you eventually choose to work will have your professional commitment so you need to be comfortable that you have all the information you need to make an informed decision.

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Teaching in a British School in Spain – FAQ

After years of recruiting people to work with us in Spain I have put together a list of the frequently asked questions. These are taken from questions that I frequently hear from interview candidates. Hopefully this helps teachers who are maybe considering a move to working in Spain but if you have any other questions do post them in ‘comments’ and I will answer them as best I can. These are based on my personal experience in my own school so answers may differ for other schools.

What contract do teachers have?
All teachers are placed on a full time permanent contract from day one of their employment. We do this in recognition of the commitment teachers have made in relocating to work with us but also because life in Spain is made easier with a permanent contract. Obtaining credit, buying a car and even opening a bank account are made easier with a permanent contract. Teachers are salaried over twelve months which include holiday pay throughout the year up to and including the August holiday.

I don’t speak Spanish. Will this be a problem?
Our English staff do not need to speak Spanish in school. In fact, our policy is for our English staff to only ever speak with our pupils in English. Clearly in your own private life a working knowledge of Spanish is helpful if you are living in Spain. For this reason the school provides free Spanish lessons to all staff each year.

What does the working day look like?
The working day runs from 9am-5pm. Children begin to arrive in school from 9.15am with classes starting at 9.30am. Lessons are fifty minutes long and we have six lessons per day. Children have a 30 minute morning break and a 20 minute afternoon break. Lunchtime is one and a half hours with teachers doing a thirty minute duty during lunchtime.

What planning and preparation time is given to teachers?
Teachers receive a generous amount of planning and preparation time during the school day. Primary staff currently receive just over five hours of planning and preparation time. In addition having completed their duty teachers have a full hour for lunch which again contributes to our staff completing all of their work during the school day.

What professional development opportunities are available?
As a member of the National Association of British Schools in Spain (NABSS) we have access to a range of professional development opportunities throughout the year. Our teachers have attended training courses in Valencia, Madrid, Seville, Alicante and Tenerife. All of these courses have been run by experts brought out from the United Kingdom. This enables our staff to stay up to date with curriculum and policy changes taking place in the United Kingdom and ensure that their own teaching continues to develop. We also run ‘in-house’ training. This has included a full day of training for all staff where we employed trainers from the United Kingdom as well as opportunities to look at more specific issues during shorter training sessions.

Do staff eat with children?
Staff can choose to eat in the dining room with children although most staff choose to eat with colleagues in one of the two desginated staff dining areas. Staff are entitled to eat for free from our canteen. Meals are prepared daily from fresh seasonal ingredients. There is a focus on Mediterranean cuisine so plenty of fresh fish, shell fish and meats are accompanied by seasonal fruits and vegetables. Most days a salad is also on offer. The school caters for a range of specific diets.

What happens with extra-curricular activities?
Most of our pupils travel to and from school on our school transport therefore extra-curricular activities take place during the lunchtime. We have a programme of activities led by professional staff from outside school. Activities include ballet, funky dance, Chinese, German, Italian, football, tennis, judo and fencing. Alongside these activities teachers from our primary team provide complementary activities that enrich the curriculum. Teachers leading an extra-curricular activity do so in place of their usual lunchtime duty.

How does Spanish social security work?
On arriving in Spain the school employs a solicitor to process paperwork for new teachers. This includes registering new staff with the Spanish social security system. This provides full cover for health, unemployment and pensions. All of the necessary paperwork is paid for and completed by the school on your behalf.

What about healthcare?
The Spanish public health system is recognised to be of an exceptionally high standard. Treatments are provided with minimal waiting times. In addition the school provides a private health care for employees covering their time in school and their journey to and from school.

Are there any other staff benefits at the school?
We have an established staff benefits package that provides advantages with a number of local business. We have financial benefits arranged with a number of banks including Barclays Bank, BBVA, and Catalunya Caixa. These provide cash back on purchases, guaranteed overdraft arrangements and preferential rates on mortgages, account transfers and credit cards or loans.
We also have arrangements in place for discounts with regard to private health care including preferential monthly rates with Adeslas, Avisa, BBVA and MAPFRE. A local dentistry practice offers our staff 15% off all treatments.
Our staff benefits package is growing all the time and teachers are provided with the full details of this package when they start working at the school.

What is the salary and are there opportunities to supplement my salary?
The salary for teachers is 22,500€ per year. Tax rates in Spain are significantly lower than the United Kingdom with most teachers paying around 14% which includes tax and National Insurance contributions. The school has a number of positions of responsibility with the primary department currently offering six members of staff a responsibility allowance in addition to their salary.
Some parents may request additional classes for children in the hour after school and these are always offered initially to our teaching staff. These classes are worth upto 48€ per hour.
Although not obligatory teachers are welcome to work in the Saturday school which the school runs from 10am-1pm on a Saturday morning. This provides English lessons to children from the local area who do not attend the school. Teachers choosing to do this receive a separate payment in addition to their usual salary.

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A comparison between teaching in Spain and teaching in the United Kingdom

I started my teaching in Plymouth in the United Kingdom. Having worked there for fourteen years I moved to Spain where I have lived and worked for the last seven years. Teachers from the UK often want to know what the differences are or automatically assume everything here must be fantastic. This is just a brief overview of what I consider to be the five most significant positive and negative aspects of teaching in Spain. I will ignore bland comments about the weather and the beaches and focus instead on the teaching and life in school. All of this is from my own experience and therefore other teachers in different schools or different parts of Spain may hold differing points of view.

Positives

  1. In 2009 a survey in the UK found that most teachers reported working more than 50 hours per week. Moreover, a teacher contract in the UK is to work for 195 days of the year with 190 of those days identified as teaching days. The remaining 170 days should be protected and teachers should not be directed to work on those days. My own experience was that in order to do the job to the standard required I left work on a Friday evening with sufficient work for 10-12 hours of weekend work. I suppose you could argue that wasn’t directed but without doing that work planning and marking would not have been completed to the necessary standards. With about two and a half hours of planning and preparation time provided in the UK working week, trying to fit necessary work into the school day was impossible.
    By contrast, we give our primary teachers in Spain 6hrs 50mins per week of non-contact time during the school day. With a full hour of lunch break too there is more than enough time in the working day to complete the necessary work. The result is that evenings and weekends feel more relaxed and it is genuinely possible to walk out of school on Friday with the classroom prepared for Monday and no need to think about school until you return the next week. That provides for a far healthier lifestyle and much of the anxiety and pressure feels lifted from day one.
  2. The teacher is still a position of respect in society in Spain. This is a status that in the UK has been steadily eroded over the last few decades. The most positive aspect of this is that parents look to teachers for advice about how to help their children at home. The teacher is seen as a partner working with the parents and the sensation of parental support is very different to that found in many schools in the UK.
  3. Based on the three inspections I experienced in the UK and the three inspections I have experienced in Spain, the anxiety surrounding inspections in Spain feels very different to the UK. Inspections in Spain are thorough and professional but take place in a climate of providing external professional opinions about the school and how it can improve. There isn’t the same judgmental feel of UK inspections which, regardless of how they may be presented, still seem to be out to find the 15,000 poor teachers that Mr. Woodhead infamously declared were lurking in our schools. An inspection day in Spain is a far more positive experience. Certainly it is focused on teaching and learning but there isn’t the threatening feel that teachers often report from UK inspections. Perhaps it helps that the inspecting body is separated from the politics of education. Inspections in Spain still carry a reasonable period of notice and don’t come with the ever present threat of being labelled and placed into a category.
  4. Children’s behaviour is generally different to the UK. The culture in Spain is very different and children are an accepted part of their parents’ life. Going for meals out in the evening is always a family affair and the notion of baby sitters is alien to most Spanish people. In a way, children are permitted to remain children for longer than in the UK. Most Spanish children inherit the society view of teachers as an authority figure to be respected. In the UK a common complaint amongst colleagues was that a significant minority of children had the capacity to derail the teaching and learning. And that even after the teacher had spent all Sunday planning and resourcing what should have been great lessons. The class behaviour in Spain is significantly better than that found in most UK schools and the end result is that it is far easier to focus on aspects of teaching and learning and to be a great teacher. Conversations in school staffrooms tend to be more about teaching and learning and less about individual characters that have spent the morning disrupting classes and preventing learning from taking place.
  5. Schools and education are still supposed to be fun in Spain and political correctness doesn’t get in the way of a celebration. Our school still celebrates Christmas, carnival, and Fallas (a regional festival) and gives these celebrations the class time needed to make them an enjoyable part of the educational calendar. Multi-culturalism exists but adapts to the Spanish society.

Negatives

  1. Spanish education, even private education, runs on a significantly smaller budget than in the UK. Many UK educational authorities are spending between seven and eight thousand pounds per pupil. Typical costs for private education in Spain is between three and four thousand Euros. Clearly this translates into school in a variety of ways. Technology may not be quite so regularly updated as in the UK and resources purchased for classrooms need caring for as they may be expected to last longer.
  2. Spanish authorities love paperwork and a new teacher to Spain may find some of this daunting. Nothing can be requested without a backup file of paperwork. Even purchasing a mobile telephone can become a complicated mountain of essential forms. Most schools should help teachers with this adaptation but be prepared for a very different approach to anything official than is found in the UK. Forget online websites allowing you to fill out forms and be prepared for government offices that only open for a few hours each morning and are quite unforgiving if you are missing what they deem to be an essential piece of paper.
  3. Workers’ rights in Spain are different to in the UK. Behaviours that are trusted without evidence in the UK under Spanish law need evidencing. A sick leave in the UK for example that allows for a period of self-certification requires a doctor note from day one in Spain. Even funerals in Spain give out certificates of attendance so workers can evidence to their employers that they were where they said they would be. This attitude of needing to account for sickness, for example, is a cultural change that for some people may take a period of adaptation.
  4. Spanish school holidays do not follow the same pattern as UK school holidays. Half terms don’t exist although dependent on the region of Spain there will be other public holidays to celebrate Spanish fiestas. With the main Spanish Christmas celebration being 6th January schools tend to work more closely to Christmas than in the UK which can mean a Christmas term running from 1st September through to 22nd December without any substantial holiday periods. Although this balances out over the course of the year and holidays in fact are slightly more generous than in the UK the lack of a half term may be a shock initially.
  5. Wages in Spain are lower than in the UK. Experienced teachers may well find that their experience is not taken into account in Spain and they are placed on a standard teaching salary. With a salary of 22,500€ for teachers in independent schools many UK teachers will find themselves taking a pay cut to work in Spain. Obviously the less years of experience you have the less of a problem this will be but a teacher at the top of the pay scale with a management responsibility may well find Spanish teaching pays around 60% of their UK salary. Obviously lower taxes (14% to be inclusive of tax and social security) and in general a lower cost of living account for a significant part of that wage difference.

Overall

Is a move to a teaching position in Spain right for you? Everybody has their own personal circumstances but Spain does offer a great quality of work and private life and a balance between the two. Spain, being in Europe, is less of a culture shock than perhaps a move to the middle or far east. The culture, climate and countryside I have left out of the equation here in order to focus on the teaching but really perhaps the fact that January temperatures on the Mediterranean coast average at 17 degrees Celsius (the same as July temperatures for the south-east of England) could still be considered important in making a decision.

If after reading this you still have questions about the positive and negative aspects do leave comments and I will reply.

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Applying to teach in Spain – which school should you choose

It’s the time of year when International schools begin their advertising for positions starting in September. But, if you are considering a move to teaching in Spain how do you know which school to choose?

Teaching in Spain offers three options. The first option and the one I will focus on in this article is teaching in a British school in Spain. British schools will teach the British National Curriculum. The other two options are to work as an English teacher in a Spanish school or to teach in an academy. The Spanish education system is quite protective of Spanish teachers and entering a Spanish state school would require a high level language exam in Spanish and then the Spanish exam of teacher knowledge. (Convalidating English teaching degrees in order that they can be recognised by a Spanish state school is notoriously challenging and expensive.)  An academy in Spain is not the same as in England. “Academy” refers to language schools. Often these will operate outside of the normal school day and will offer language lessons in a TEfL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) style approach. Although a living can be made from an academy a regular monthly income can often not be guaranteed. Hours will be as customer demands and there is likely to be significant fluctuation in monthly take home pay.

So, what about teaching in a British School in Spain? The first requirement of any reputable British School will be that candidates for teaching positions are qualified teachers. Most will also ask that the qualification is from the United Kingdom or recognised in the United Kingdom. Applicants from outside of the European Union are often welcomed but obtaining the necessary work permits can take longer.

Within Spain the private school industry is relatively unregulated compared to the United Kingdom. Consequently there are ‘good’ and ‘bad’ employers to be found. Most UK teachers with experience of working overseas will tell you that accreditation from the British Council is the most important recognition. In Spain there are only a very few schools directly licensed by the British Council. However, there is an established network within Spain that provides a considerable benefit to UK teachers looking to work in a British School. The organisation ‘National Association of British Schools in Spain’ (NABBS) has a recognition within the UK and provides a set of standards and employee rights that gives a level of protection and ensures that the school is of an appropriate standard. These schools also undergo an inspection that is approved by the British Council and responsable for ensuring a high quality of British education.

You can cross-reference advertisements on TES Online with the NABBS website. Once you have confirmed that the school has British Council or NABBS membership you can be reasonably assured that you have identified an appropriate potential employer.

Most Spanish independent schools are privately owned and most of those are privately owned by a Spanish family or a Spanish company. In essence, like many UK private schools, they are businesses. The most significant difference for many teachers moving to teach in Spain is not actually the change of country but the change from being in state education to being in private education. I would advise that happier adaptations to this change are found if the school itself has a duty of care for the education provided. This can be found out in a number of ways. Firstly, looking at the advertisement that the school has placed. I would be wary of any school not taking advantage of a profesional advertisement on TES Online. Failing to provide a school insignia, photographs or a link to the school website all indicate a business keen to save every possible penny. If the webite is available take a look. Does it appear to be just a shop window, an online advert, or does it reflect the values and mission statement of the school? Does the school provide a welcome pack as a part of their advertisement? Does the welcome pack include information about support given to employees?

Having applied to the school, reputable schools will consider an interview a two way process and will welcome your questions. If the advertisement is for a short notice position then a Skype or telephone interview may be offered. However, if the position has been advertised with sufficient time then a face to face interview is a more profesional approach. A school advertising a September post in March or April that is unwilling to finance a face to face interview in the UK I would suggest is sending out a negative message about the value they place on their teaching staff.

As a final thought, what should you expecct from an interview? British schools in Spain, especially if they have visited London or another UK city to offer face to face interview, have made a substantial financial commitment to obtaining their teaching staff. They will be interested not only in your profesional role as a teacher but also in your personal profile as somebody preparing to make an international move. Anything you can do to indicate preparation for your move will strengthen your interview. Have you begun to learn the language? Have you considered aspects of adaptation to living away from family and friends? The interview is also a two way process. There should be a chance for you to ask what support the school offers new teachers. Relocation packages in terms of direct financial gifts are not common for Spain but support in terms of finding accomodation and arranging necessary paperwork including becoming a part of the Spanish health system should be provided.

If you approach a move carefully and consider the school and the support offered then living and teaching in Spain can be a wonderful move. With sunshine, almost universally supportive parents andvery few behaviour problems it is easier to focus on the teaching and remember why you chose this profession.

If you want further information please do post questions in the comments section below and I will reply.

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