Tag Archives: teaching in spain

Foundation, KS1 and KS2 teaching posts for September 2015

New teaching posts available in Spain for September 2015.
Teach in Spain – visit the links to the TES Online advertisement below and apply for your September 2015 teaching position.
If you have any other questions about living or teaching in Spain then please do post them in the comments box and I will reply.

All teachers are offered a full time, permanent contract from the first day of their employment. Annual salary is made in 12 monthly payments and tax is payable at the local rate. The school is able to offer some flexibility in year group and accepts applications from teachers in foundation, Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2. Newly Qualified Teachers are welcome to apply.
The final date for applications is Friday 8th May 2015 with interviews held in London during the week beginning Monday 11th May 2015.

Foundation/KS1/KS2 teaching post

Below are links to a variety of pages providing information about living and teaching in Spain. If you need more information about teaching in Spain please do contact us.

5 things NQTs should know about working abroad

5 things to know about renting in Spain

5 tips for your interview with an international school

Relocating to Spain with a family – a guide

Teaching in a British School in Spain – a FAQ

A comparison between teaching in Spain and teaching in the UK

Applying to teach in Spain – which school should you choose?

 

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Foundation and Key Stage 1 teaching posts for September 2015

Posts available in British schools in Madrid and Andalucia.

Teaching positions are currently being recruited for a September 2015 start. There are positions available for Foundation Stage teachers, Key Stage 1 teachers and also for assistants. The basic salary offered is 22,500€ with increments available for teachers with the experience to take on a coordinator role.

Teach in Spain. British schools in Spain provide the opportunity to teach the British curriculum in a stunning setting.

Teach in Andalucia in the south of Spain or if you prefer the city life, teach in Madrid.

To apply please send you CV and a covering letter to:
recruitment@ukteacherinspain.com

Interviews will be via Skype.

To read more information about teaching in Spain check the articles below.

5 things NQTs should know about working abroad

5 things to know about renting in Spain

5 tips for your interview with an international school

Relocating to Spain with a family – a guide

Teaching in a British school in Spain – a FAQ

A comparison between teaching in Spain and teaching in the UK

Applying to teach in Spain – which school should you choose?

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Monthly top 5 roundup – February 2015

Top five pages from the Internet, top five pages from this site and product of the month all in one convenient place.

The power of five

Top 5 pages from the Internet

1. New commission on primary assessment – After telling schools that they should work out for themselves how to assess pupils, now a commission is being set up to tell schools how they should assess.
2. The problem with lesson planning – David Didau on his blog, The Learning Spy, started the month looking at lesson planning.
3. The challenge for the DfE with workload – Michael Tidd takes a look at the government workload challenge and concludes, “At least we’re heading in the right direction.”
4. The expert in a year challenge – An illustration of the possibilities when targeted practice and growth mindset are brought together.
5. Resourceasourus.co.uk – This site gets a special mention. It looks new but sites like this are breaking with the tradition that teachers should share their work for free. It will be interesting to see if any school ever challenges on the basis of intellectual property rights. Until then, pop your teaching resources on here and receive payment each time they are downloaded.

Top 5 pages from this site

1. All the info. you need to know about teaching abroad – With over 4000 views, this collection of links to information about teaching abroad gets February’s top slot.
2. Two great ideas for displaying pupil targets
3. Teacher turnover and high performing school systems – Why is teacher turnover so low (3%) in high performing school systems?
4. Combating cyber bullying – A great free video resource for exploring cyber bullying with pupils.
5. Using a portfolio effectively on interview – What should be in an interview portfolio and how can you use it to secure your next education post?

Product of the month

This month we have been discussing display in school. We agreed a display policy and then spent time making sure that class displays were purposeful and focused on learning. We also had a staff meeting where we walked around the school and each teacher spent a couple of minutes talking about how they were using display in their own classrooms. A great resource for display ideas is the Belair series of books. The link below is for the general primary display book but there are others with ideas for specific curriculum areas.

Belair on display – The Essential Guide to Primary Display
by Noel Springett-McHugh

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Preparing to move abroad – learning a language

Are you preparing for a move to live and work in a different country? If your move takes you to a country where a different language is spoken then it may well be worth preparing before you leave. Any effort you can put in before you move may well make those first few days and weeks in your new home easier.

When we were considering moving to Spain one of the most useful pieces of advice I received was “learn the language”. Statistically, people who make an effort to learn the language when they relocate abroad are more likely to have a positive experience and more likely to remain in their host country.

In 2008 when we were looking to move abroad we registered with a local evening class and spent two hours of each week studying. This was successful for us as it gave us a structure and an incentive. Once I started becoming more confident with the basics then I invested in a CD language course and a number of books. All of these were helpful, but mainly because I already had a weekly class that kept my interest and made the language learning a regular part of my week. The investment in a language learning course before moving really does help. It is tempting to think that when you move it will be easy to learn the language but if you are intending working in your host country then your first few months are likely to be spent adapting to a new job. You may not, at least initially, have time and energy left for study at the end of your working day.

Transparent Spanish Complete Edition

Transparent Spanish Complete Edition

Moving to a different country and a different culture can be quite isolating. Learning the language is an important part of enjoying social interactions in the same way as you do in your home country. Simple aspects of day to day life like asking where a product is in a shop or passing the time of day with a neighbour are all impossible if language is a barrier.

We always offer lessons to our new teachers which are entirely voluntary but extremely popular. Those teachers who have made an effort to begin their language learning before moving do adapt to life here in Spain much more quickly.

The second language aspect of moving abroad to teach is understanding how to help pupils who almost certainly do not have English as their home language. The main difference that you may find in working with a high proportion of pupils with English as an additional language (EAL pupils) is that you become aware of the need for a technical knowledge of English. Children will have questions and without a confident technical knowledge of English then providing the right answers and support is impossible. One way to improve your knowledge of English is to enroll on a Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) course. This may not be essential for the teaching job you are taking abroad. However, the improvement to your own knowledge of English grammar will make you better equipped to support EAL pupils.


i-to-i

i-to-i professional TEFL certificate – 140 hours

Anything you can do to improve your own language knowledge, whether that be the language spoken in your host country or your knowledge of English, will make adaptation to living abroad easier.

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Teaching posts and all the info. you need about teaching abroad

Teaching posts in Spain and the links that give you the information you need, all in one place.
If you have any other questions about living or teaching in Spain then please do post them in the comments box and I will reply.

Primary teaching post
Secondary English (plus humanities) post
Secondary Maths (plus science) post

As of 10th March 2015 the teaching posts above are now filled. If you are interested in applying for a teaching position in Spain please send your Curriculum Vitae together with a covering letter to: recruitment@ukteacherinspain.com

5 things NQTs should know about working abroad

5 things to know about renting in Spain

5 tips for your interview with an international school

Relocating to Spain with a family – a guide

Teaching in a British School in Spain – a FAQ

A comparison between teaching in Spain and teaching in the UK

Applying to teach in Spain – which school should you choose?

5 things I never worried about when I taught in England

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What Russian tennis tells us about talent

Is talent innate, a birthright awarded to the lucky few, or is it something that we all have if it is developed correctly? Given the right experience and opportunities can we all excel?

I remember, when training as a teacher, hearing a lecturer tell us that in our class every child was gifted. Our task was to discover in what field they were gifted and to provide the learning opportunities to develop in this area. Maybe this is true but perhaps talent works in different ways.

Spartak tennis club in Moscow has attracted attention as a result of success. Perhaps it is an example of growth mindset in action. Carol Dweck’s Mindset: How You Can Fulfil Your Potential explores why mindset is important to success and Spartak certainly relies upon the correct mindset. Let’s take a look at some facts about Spartak tennis club.

Indoors facilities at Spartak tennis club

Spartak tennis club, Moscow

– It is located on the outskirts of Moscow and has only one indoor court. For many months of the year the outside temperatures mean the only facility available is this one court.
– Three of the top six female Russian tennis players (four if you include the now retired Anna Kournikova) were trained at Spartak.
– Between 2004 and 2007 Spartak achieved eight players in the women’s year end top 20 rankings. In the same time the whole of the USA achieved only seven.
– Spartak has produced more top 20 players on the WTA than the whole of the USA. It has produced more top 20 players on the WTA than the whole of Europe.

But why? What happens to make such a small tennis club stand out. Two things took place here that cemented the celebrated position it now holds in tennis history. Firstly, the lady responsible for coaching took what was, at the time, a unique approach. Secondly, in terms of believing something is possible, success breeds success.

Larisa Preobrazhenskaya

Larisa Preobrazhenskaya – the mother of Russian tennis

The coaching strategy
The coach responsible for the success of Spartak was Larisa Preobrazhenskaya. She developed a system of coaching perhaps in part as a result of her limited resources. Where the USA and Europe were training tennis players by getting them into tournaments from a young age, Larisa was training their muscles. Working in a way that is now common in sports science she realised that a movement could become hard wired (or myelinated) into the brain if it was practised repeatedly. Her coaching strategy was to have her students practise the correct movement for playing different tennis strokes. The students practised in slow motion, with no ball and no game being played. They repeated for hours and with time increased the speed. Only when the students presented with sufficient skill to handle a range of strokes correctly did Larisa use tournament play in the training regime.
In effect, Larisa took the old adage “practice makes perfect” and honed it into “targeted practice makes perfect”. Why spend hours playing a game that might bring only a small amount of opportunity to play a backhand stroke down the line when you can practise that stroke a hundred times in a couple of hours? Daniel Coyle in The Talent Code: Greatness isn’t born. It’s grown explores this notion that with the right training talent can be developed. So, is talent simply a matter of the right training or is there something else needed?

Belief breeds success
The importance of self-belief is vital for success in any field. If you don’t believe you can excel then how can you dedicate the time and energy needed. By the way, if you’re still not sure how much time, 10,000 hours. Malcolm Gladwell identified that in any given field to become an expert takes 10,000 hours of practice. That is usually around ten years of dedication. (Outliers: The Story of Success).
Spartak suddenly burst onto the scene with the success of Anna Kournikova. In 2001 Russia had one player in the WTA top 30. In 2007 half of the WTA top 10 were Russian women. In fact, in 2004 the French open final between Myskina and Dementieva showcased an all Spartak final. (A tournament event that became quite common.)
This isn’t unique and talent pools develop elsewhere in the world when an exemplar succeeds and demonstrates what is possible. In 1998 Se Ri Pak from South Korea sank a birdie putt to win the US Women’s Open. This made her the youngest to win, the only South Korean to win, indeed, the only Asian to ever win the tournament. The result, within ten years South Korea jumped from having one player in the top fifty to having more in the top fifty than the whole of the USA. Ten years on and Se Ri Pak was still playing but now although still in the top fifty she was only the 14th highest placed golfer from South Korea. Her success gave belief to South Korean golf and that was the catalyst to a practical take over of the golfing world.

What does this mean for teachers
As teachers, this is important. It is science and it is proven but does it have a place in the classroom? I believe so and I believe there are two key points to take away.

1: Training needs to be targetted – don’t waste time on things that don’t matter
Do pupils have individual learning targets? Are they developing towards an achievable target that moves them forward? Do they understand what they need to do to improve and is it an objective that they can self monitor or, to put it another way, will they know when they have achieved success?

2: Belief breeds success
Using the correct feedback, praising effort as opposed to the child or the attainment, we can develop a belief. Call this what you like, Mindset, confidence or self-belief but without it there is no motivation to invest time and energy into working to improve. Teachers have a duty to make pupils believe in their own capacity to improve and this means removing labels and including individual pupils in an evaluation of their learning. If you know where you are and can see where you are going then you can buy into the possibility that you might succeed. Nothing drives motivation like the likelihood of success.

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5 things I never worried about when I taught in England

1: Wildlife
This winter we are told has been a perfect breeding ground for the processional caterpillar. With toxic hairs that easily take to the wind it is one of the most poisonous creatures locally. We go from caterpillar season into the summer when funnel web spiders and a variety of non-lethal but evil looking scorpions provide a playground distraction to any child armed with a stick.

Caterpillars

Processional caterpillars

2: What’s for lunch?
Food is such an important part of Spanish culture and parents expect their children to eat all of their lunch. Lentils as a starter and fish as a main course provides a midday motivational challenge for any duty teacher. School dinners in the UK always felt like something functional, a midday fuel up to carry us through the afternoon. I’d be misleading if I suggested every day was equal. However, a day that starts with a chicken caesar salad, has a traditional Spanish rice dish such as “arroz al horno” for a main course and finishes with fresh oranges makes school dinner feel less like fuel and more like a dining experience.

Traditional Spanish rice dish

Arroz al horno – a rice dish made with pork ribs and blood sausage

3: Wind
A windy day in England meant that the children were a little more bubbly than usual. Teachers walked around with long faces muttering glib asides about animals and children “having the wind up them”.
The tiniest bit of wind in Spain puts us on tree watch. Mediterranean pines are notoriously fragile. Dry and top heavy, the slightest breeze can cause weighty branches to topple. In fact, there is a general preoccupation with weather. Rain, wind, cold and sun all bring their own concerns.

4: Food consumption
Spanish culture provides for five meals each day. A light breakfast in the morning, a mid-morning snack, lunch, an afternoon snack and a dinner are considered essential pit stops in the working day. Ensuring all the children have been provided in the main meal of the day but also in the two snacks that take place in the school day is one of the most important responsibilities of the day.

5: Buses!
Each morning 15 coaches arrive at school. Each carries up to 58 children, many of whom will be clutching notes instructing which bus route they will be taking home. Maybe they are going to a grandparents house after school, or a family house in the mountains or by the beach. Other bus changes will be telephoned in to school during the day. The task of getting over 800 children on to the right transport is a complex nightmare that somehow seems to pull perfectly together in the last few minutes of every day.

And aside from all of the above we still manage to spend focusing on teaching and learning and making sure that each of the children gets a great deal from attending our school.

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NQTs abroad – 5 things all NQTs should know

With grateful thanks to @MissNQT for prompting this article. Here are 5 things NQTs should know if they are going to spend their first year teaching abroad. (All based on my own experience of working in an international school in Spain.)

Hello my name is the NQT

1: How long do I have to complete my induction year?
After completing the teaching course and gaining Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) you have to complete an induction year. Currently there is no time limit on when this has to be completed. If you are not in a permanent post though you can only do short term supply (posts of less than one term) for up to five years.
Point 1: Your induction year is completely without time limit. No matter how long you spend teaching abroad you can complete your induction year when/if you return to the UK.

2: Can I complete my induction year in an international school?
Technically “yes” due to a change that came in during 2014. If the school you work in has had a British Schools Overseas (BSO) inspection then they can choose to offer NQT induction. Because this is managed by a teaching school in the UK the cost to the international school is quite significant and therefore even schools that have opted for a BSO inspection may choose not to oversee your induction year. The BSO inspection only came in recently though and therefore most overseas school are not BSO inspected.
Point 2: Technically you can complete your induction year in a small but growing number of international schools. However, this option is unlikely to be available to you.

Get Ready to Teach: A Guide for the Newly Qualified Teacher (NQT)

3: So, what happens if I haven’t done my induction year but have spent some time abroad?
Teaching at an independent school can’t count as an induction year but local authorities can reduce your induction time to as little as one term if they recognise the experience you have gained in an independent school. It is possible that they may apply this to your time spent teaching abroad. If not, returning to the UK would mean beginning you induction year.
Point 3: When you return to the UK you may be asked to do your induction year but you may also be able to negotiate it to as little as one term.

Not Quite a Teacher: Target Practice for Beginning Teachers

4: What about my pay and conditions?
Pay in Spain does not follow the teacher pay spine as used in the UK. All teachers start on the same salary of 22,500€ per year. This makes the salary in Spain, even with current exchange rates, quite comparable to that paid to NQTs in the UK. Planning and preparation time will often be far in excess of that given in the UK. We don’t give our NQTs more time than other teachers but all teaching staff in our primary department have five hours of preparation time per week. In addition there is a full hour for lunch and an additional fifty minutes of break time each day. With less workload caused by unnecessary paperwork NQTS working in our schools are better off in terms of planning and preparation time than they would be in the UK.
Point 4: Pay in Spain for an NQT is 22,500€ per year. Factor in the lower cost of living and lower taxes and as an NQT you are financially better off in Spain. Planning and preparation time is generous and in excess of that given to you in the UK.

How to survive your first year in teaching
by Sue Cowley

5: Be the best you can be.
It sounds like basic advice but make sure that these first years of teaching are the springboard to a long and happy career. Don’t treat your time abroad as downtime before returning to work in the UK. Apply yourself to the job and seek advice when needed. Be the best you can be. By acting professionally you are developing your skill and writing a reference that makes you far more attractive to UK schools. Your time spent teaching the British curriculum abroad will make your applications stand out. New skills such as working with a high proportion of EAL pupils or even learning a foreign language yourself will all help to make you an interesting candidate for a future career move, whether that be to the UK or anywhere else in the world.
Point 5: Be the best you can be.

Teacher Tote Bag by CafePress

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Spanish Sunday

A brunch and a walk on the beach in Cullera.

Chivito

Chivito – The perfect Valencian brunch

Sunday afternoon and the weather from the last few days has changed. There was a brief flurry of snow in Valencia at one point this week but nothing like the images of stranded motorists that have made the international news.

It was great then to wake up to a warmer day today and a feel of spring in the air. One of the real highlights of working in Spain is the weekend. With a workload that is manageable, without any intervention needed from Nicky Morgan, and weather that rarely interferes with plans, weekends are relaxing.

Everywhere Spanish Audio Course

After a slow start to the day we headed out to the beach at the nearby town of Cullera. Breakfast was a Chivito, a traditional Valencian bocadillo. Think Spanish style all day breakfast. With pork slices, bacon, cheese, fried egg, lettuce, tomato and mayo it is a high calorie, high flavour weekend brunch.

Palm trees

Palm trees – Cullera

The sky today was clear and the temperature in the sun felt like an English summer afternoon.

Cullera beach

Cullera beach

In the summer Cullera beach fills with sun-worshippers and the sand disappears beneath a kaleidoscope of sun shades. In the winter it is a different scene and the beach is almost deserted. The weather must be warming as today there were people in the sea for the first time this year. Spanish weekends definitely help the sensation that workload is reasonable here and that work and life are better balanced than they are for colleagues working in the United Kingdom.

Rose by the water

Cullera beach

Transparent Spanish Complete Edition

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Dear teacher…

Today sees the publication of our adverts for positions at British School Alzira/Xativa.

Primary school post: Foundation – Key Stage 2

Secondary post: English (with secondary subject humanities)

Secondary post: Maths (with secondary subject science)

I came here seven years ago with the intention of enjoying the experience for a couple of years.

The truth is that the children are engaging and positive about their learning. The school achieves excellent standards and teachers enjoy being a part of that team. I have written a number of blog posts to help people considering a move to Spain and I am reposting them here so that potential candidates have access to a wealth of information.

If you still have questions about our schools or just general questions about relocating to Spain then please do post them in the comments section.

5 things to know about renting in Spain

Your interview with an international school

Relocating to Spain with family

Teaching in a British School in Spain – FAQ

A comparison between teaching in Spain and teaching in the United Kingdom

Applying to teach in Spain – which school should you choose?

 

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